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  • Rusakov
    replied
    Originally posted by Daryn View Post
    I suspect there's a lot of wishful thinking there.
    You'd be surprised...

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    A lofty goal for sure, but that's the same sort of thing Gordon Moore said about Intel. Eventually, those gains slowed down. We'll keep an eye on things, but I suspect there's a lot of wishful thinking there. Then again, Quantum computing is also becoming a thing, so who knows?

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    Originally posted by Daryn View Post
    I just fear that Big Pharma will get their hands on it and start charging through the nose for those medications.
    Aye, that's always a problem (at least here in North America).

    In other news...

    IBM Research AI Hardware Center marks first birthday with explosive gains in AI computation

    The Center is taking a holistic, end-to-end approach to AI hardware, spanning the computing stack all the way from fundamental materials research to AI workloads. Our goal is to improve compute performance efficiency 1,000x by 2029, with the annual delivery of new AI accelerator cores, targeting 2.5X improvement per year. We’ve more than doubled that gain in the first year.
    Bolding mine, and that gets a "wowzers" from me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    Agreed. Anything that will cut down on a laundry list of side-effects can only be a good thing. I just fear that Big Pharma will get their hands on it and start charging through the nose for those medications.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    AI could help design better drugs that don’t clash with other medication - MIT Technology Review

    A new system that can predict a proposed drug’s chemical structure could help prevent adverse drug interactions, one of the leading causes of patient death.
    Since I take several drugs that work on my brain, this is good news for me too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Little Rick
    replied
    A must-watch if you're into A.I.!

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    Microsoft Announces Massive $1 Billion Investment in OpenAI

    Microsoft is investing a massive $1 billion in OpenAI. The companies today announced a new partnership that will involve both the firms working together to build new AI tech and expand OpenAI’s Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) efforts. OpenAI was originally co-founded by Elon Musk in an effort to build AI systems that are safe and “benefits all of humanity“.

    The investment will see OpenAI moving all of its services to Microsoft’s cloud. The company will be using Azure to create new AI tech and deliver on its AGI promises.

    Both the companies will also be working together to develop new Azure AI supercomputing technologies. Microsoft will also become OpenAI’s preferred partner for commercializing new AI tech as part of the partnership.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    MIT: We're building on Julia programming language to open up AI coding to novices

    MIT, where the popular Julia language was born, has created a probabilistic-programming system called 'Gen', which it says will make it easier for newbies to get started with computer vision, robotics, and statistics.

    Gen is part of Julia, which MIT researchers debuted Julia in 2012 and over the past year has become one of the world's most popular languages, currently sitting in 44th place on the Tiobe programming language index, just behind official Android language Kotlin, Microsoft's JavaScript superset TypeScript, and Mozilla-created Rust.

    According to MIT, Gen's creators "incorporate several custom modeling languages into Julia" to create the new AI programming system, which allows users to create AI models and algorithms "without having to deal with equations or manually write high-performance code".

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    I can see the folks working on self-driving cars being very interested in something like this. Right now, you can mess with a self-driving car by putting anomalies into the environment. Like, putting a specific sticker on a stop sign cases the algorithm to ignore it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    Researchers develop 'vaccine' against attacks on machine learning

    Researchers from CSIRO's Data61, the data and digital specialist arm of Australia's national science agency, have developed a world-first set of techniques to effectively 'vaccinate' algorithms against adversarial attacks, a significant advancement in machine learning research.

    Algorithms 'learn' from the data they are trained on to create a machine learning model that can perform a given task effectively without needing specific instructions, such as making predictions or accurately classifying images and emails. These techniques are already used widely, for example to identify spam emails, diagnose diseases from X-rays, predict crop yields and will soon drive our cars.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    Wearable intelligence is a fascinating topic. Right now we've got Siri or Google assistant, but I don't think this is the peak yet. We want Jarvis. An AI that's personal, knows us, and gives us the info w need when we need it. There's no shortage of work being done in this field, but I wonder if the big companies like Goog,e Apple, or Amazon are the ones that get there first? I'm not so sure about that. This is one area that I think has room for an upstart to think outside the box.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    A couple of stories, also links only b/c of burnout.

    How Wearable AI Will Amplify Human Intelligence

    This next one is a preview only, but still might interest some of you.

    Link

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    I'd love to see how it'll handle the snowstorm that's happening right now. It's really nice progress, though..

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    After just 20 hours of training, Wayve's fast-learning AI car is already driving itself on unfamiliar roads

    Forget large arrays of sensors and radars. Forget hard-coded road rules. British startup Wayve taught a car to teach itself to drive, and using only some cameras, a sat-nav and 20 hours' worth of experience, it's already driving itself short distances on unfamiliar UK roads.

    When these guys first put their control hardware, camera, computers and AI learning software into a Renault Twizy-based StreetDrone back in July last year, the result was a machine that went from literally not knowing what the pedals and steering wheel did, to being able to follow a lane more or less indefinitely, in the space of just 20 minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    Originally posted by Daryn View Post
    LOL, yeah! All of this is still narrow AI, though. I think the hollywoodvision of general AI is still a really long time away.
    Yeah, I was just making a joke.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    LOL, yeah! All of this is still narrow AI, though. I think the hollywoodvision of general AI is still a really long time away. Who knows, this might be a step towards that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    An AI is playing Pictionary to figure out how the world works

    It might be a frivolous after-dinner game to you, but Pictionary could perhaps give AI programs a deeper understanding of the world.

    AI’s lack of common sense is one of the main obstacles to the development of chatbots and voice assistants that are genuinely useful. What’s more, while AI programs can trounce the best human players of many games, including chess, Go, and (more recently) StarCraft, mastering them offers only a narrow measure of artificial intelligence. Learning to play chess, for instance, does nothing to help a computer play Sudoku.

    Researchers at the Allen Institute for AI (Ai2) believe that Pictionary could push machine intelligence beyond its current limits. To that end, they have devised an online version of the game that pairs a human player with an AI program.
    If the AI ever spontaneously says "This is fun!" then it's probably working.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rusakov
    replied
    Amazon re:Mars conference starts June 4 in Las Vegas

    Amazon on Thursday announced an offshoot of the invitation-only MARS conference — which stands for machine learning, automation, robotics and space — that will be open to the public. The new conference, re:Mars, will run from June 4 through 7 in Las Vegas at the Aria Resort.

    There's a reason why Amazon may want to bring thinkers in these spaces together. Reports from last year suggested that Amazon is working to build home robots that it hopes to launch as soon as 2019. The company is also heavily invested in artificial intelligence through its Alexa assistant and other products.

    MARS is Amazon and Jeff Bezos' conference where billionaires and some of the brightest minds in science gather to discuss similar topics. Last year, Bezos famously took a robotic dog for a walk during the show. The year before, he walked around in a massive robot suit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daryn
    replied
    Originally posted by macrorufus View Post
    Just heard the news that the Russian "robot" unveiled recently was a man in a suit.
    Yeah, I heard that too. I'm guessing they wanted something to answer the Boston Dynamics robots with. Didn't work so well.

    Leave a comment:


  • macrorufus
    replied
    Just heard the news that the Russian "robot" unveiled recently was a man in a suit.

    Leave a comment:

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