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    Welcome to Moreytown

    https://www.choiceofgames.com/welcome-to-moreytown/

    Claw your way to the top of Moreytown, a furry slum for human-animal hybrids. Will you take down the gangs who rule the town, or take them over instead?

    Welcome to Moreytown is a 150,000-word interactive novel by S. Andrew Swann. It's entirely text-based, without graphics or sound effects, and fueled by the vast, unstoppable power of your imagination.

    You’re a moreau: a genetically engineered human-animal hybrid, a remnant of mankind’s last war. Surviving life in a Moreytown hasn't been easy, but now, someone is out to kill you and your fellow "moreys"—unexplained fires, explosions, and the gangs swirling around the neighborhood add up to big trouble. It's up to you to save your pelt, and maybe take over town.

    Play as one of thirteen different species, including tiger, capybara, bear, or wolf. Infiltrate a sinister cult, or ally yourself with a gang of moreys. Choose a side and let the fur fly!

    • Play as male, female, or non-binary, gay, straight, bi, or ace
    • Fight the police or help them to bring down a terrifying enemy
    • Save your neighborhood from utter destruction
    • Take over a street gang, or even run your own cult
    • Explore multiple potential romantic relationships
    On a personal note, I got the full version (download is free, upgrade is just $4). I got a few endings and I can say it is well-written piece of (pseudo) technoir, albeit it focuses more on hybrid-human rather than on robot-human relations. There's a simple character card (or rather, status) which describes you and relations with certain characters, but also traits and... relations to certain groups in the city.

    The universe is well-thought, because you are able not only to precise species of your character, but also origin of your character - although the latter heavily depends on the subspecies, because if you choose a fox, you can be only from United Kingdom, but if you are undefined/normal dog or cat you can input your own country was well. (You have character creation in two parts, but I cannot say more due not to spoil the plot.) Sadly, you can only choose from Rodent, Canine, Feline and Ursine main species - no birds for us, Daryn.

    I can say that game is actually... good. It is worth paying these $4 after playing first five chapters. It's very little considering I only went through three endings already - with VERY, and I say, VERY different outcomes. The language is easy, you have influence over your character as well (via decisions) and replayability is very high. Myself I found the game very interesting because of my works on Cody Faulkner stories and found a lot of similarities. It hit me right away the idea of the whole world is shockingly similiar to Cody's universe in terms of human-animal hybrids (Moreys in the game) and full human (dubbed Pinks in game).


    Edit: I found out you can play first five chapters via the link. ENJOY! Game is also available on Google Shop.
  • #2

    Huh, intresting find! I might try that thing out. Thanks for sharing.
    Terrapun's Signature
    "A smart machine will first consider which is more worth its while: to perform the given task or, instead, to figure some way out of it."
    Stanisław Lem "The Futurological Congress"

    "The universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."
    xkcd

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    • #3

      Neat find Gryphus! I'm not much of a gamer though.
      Rusakov's Signature
      This fight will be your death!

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      • #4

        Terrapun You think that writing even a short story, set in Poland in the far-near future, would be quite interesting? You know, the slums made next to e.g. Cracow or something like that? Because I don't think my hometown would be that interesting HOWEVER it is big enough to have some newly-made slums... I thought about setting such a story in Oświęcim (in which I study), but due to presence of Auschwitz Museum it could be risky and only only trigger the population (because racism, etc.).

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        • #5

          I do not think I'm the best guy to ask for writing tips, Slice is far better at it then me. Additionally we all like to do things our own way, so what works for me, might not work for you... which is fine, we are not a hive mind after all (thankfully). That being out of the way, you asked me for an opinion, so you probably wanted to read my ramblings anyway, so here goes.

          If you want to know if you should write such a story, I would say, go for it, if you think you have something to say on the subject that interests you. It is said that when you write on some real life subject or place you better know what you are writing about, it is good craftsmanship. Any factual mistake will stand out for people that are in the know, and we like to be viewed as good craftsman, not shoddy ones right?

          If you want to include some existing place in your writing, a place you lived at or are living currently is a solid choice. If you are afraid that writing about the place will trigger some people, do not name drop it, change the name, keep some vagueness to it, change some aspects of the place while preserving the feel of the it to make it recognizable... or create a fictional setting made out of things you wish to capture in your story. Some set pieces that, while being parts of your own imaginary universe, are a call back to real locations and culture you want to write about. So far so, bland, yeah I know. I never said, that my opinion will be an original one.

          There is also the question of why would you choose to write about a real life place through a lens of your fiction? Is it only to give your writing an “exotic” central European setting, or do you want to shed a light on something you associate with those places or people that live there, be it good or bad, or both. You should ask yourself “what can I say about those places and how will it influence or enhance my story or will it take something from it?”, if you want to “go deeper” on your stories, not just giving them a veneer of homeliness for homeliness sake. (Nothing wrong with just using the set pieces you like and not going “deeper” giving the insights into the society, or the human condition or whatever. Not everything needs to be a brilliant social commentary to be entertaining, it all depends on what type of story you want to write and what do you want to say with your writing. Do you want to have some deeper meaning, some “message”, or just writing an action piece, or maybe both? It's your choice in the end.)

          So, that is my take on it. Nothing you probably had not already know, but you asked for it. If you want to discuss the subject further, or something, feel free to ask. I like having an excuse to spew gibberish at people!
          Terrapun's Signature
          "A smart machine will first consider which is more worth its while: to perform the given task or, instead, to figure some way out of it."
          Stanisław Lem "The Futurological Congress"

          "The universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."
          xkcd

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          • #6

            To answer your questions, Terra, it is mostly because I intend to write in Polish because I wrote for way too long in English, except for one 'recent' RP with one Polish furry. I haven't written a thing in Polish, except for short summaries for the Science Group I'm in and an essay - the latter, obviously, about Poland's way into European Union.

            As for the short story, I got heavily inspired by the Moreytown and I found out my city has a place (a former factory - the very first in Poland! - which had been making trains and other stuff, even exporting it to countries such as USSR or even North Korea until very 1990s), which would fit for an odd ghetto for non-humans. I said it is inspired, mostly, because of the subject of racism/specism and war (Noteworthy: I drafted Codyverse/Imperfection over a year before I even learnt about the Moreytown.) I asked, because I'm more interested into opinion of a fellow Pole and - likely - think if I should, or not, translate it. However on that I must work very carefully, since it's a very similiar background (Moreytown's moreaus are effect of Pan-Asian War, which however I deduct is likely be a war between Russian Federaton and People's Republic of China).

            I already started to write such a story, as extension of current tensions in the Eastern Europe - namely a heavily fictionalized conflict on Ukraine which extended over neighbouring countries - which didn't turn into a World War but remained a huge conflict heavily funded by the United States, United Kingdom, The New Russian Federation and alike. Borders in the there were slightly changed, redrawn by the New Russian Federation and NATO - ending the Three Years War. The story takes place in 2060s, ten years after the conflict, in the real hometown's district with (now defuct) factory in which military overtaken the factory and repurposed it into light weaponry production line. In there, the hybrid post-war refugees founded their own ghetto and somewhat became mix of Russian, Polish and Vietnamese - and became cheap labour.

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            • #7

              Originally posted by Terrapun View Post
              I do not think I'm the best guy to ask for writing tips, Slice is far better at it then me.
              Oh yes, I am undeniably the best advice giver! All bow before my advising skills!

              Are you ready?

              Prepare yourselves!

              *Drumroll. Deep breath*

              I agree with what Terrapun said.

              Anything below is essentially just more of the same, although I'll include it just in case you may be interested. Still, I won't be offended if you skip it.

              First things first: write what you want to write. Don't worry if some people might find it offensive, or predictable, or too bizarre, or anything else like that. Write what you will enjoy. If you plan on sharing it, or hope to ever get it published, then that is a slightly different matter, but your enjoyment or satisfaction as a writer is still the most important thing.

              After that, if you still want to write something set in a dystopian Poland, do as Terrapun suggested and ask yourself why. If you are trying to make some kind of political or social point, I'd actually recommend against using real-world place-names. By all means make your places and people representative or even blatant references to real world counterparts, but it may seem too on-the-nose to actually keep all the same names. Meanwhile, if you're just doing it for the fun, and it's more a story of character or plot that happens to take place in an area you're familiar with, keep the same place names.

              To put it another way, Harry Potter claims itself to be set in the actual United Kingdom, with repeated references to London. 1984, possibly the most famous political novel of all time, is also set in the UK, but I don't believe ever once says that it is. Instead, they live in Airstrip One. Allusion is better than direct statement for political or social commentaries.

              As for your more detailed description of the story, it sounds very interesting, but also very complex. You have a lot of information to impart to your readers, while still trying to carry a story that they can be invested in. As such, it would require a lot of planning, making sure that you can drip-feed information to the readers without it getting in the way of the plot, but also without it being too scarce for the events to make sense or have significance.

              Now in terms of the
              Originally posted by Gryphus View Post
              mix of Russian, Polish and Vietnamese
              it may be an idea to follow in the footsteps of Anthony Burgess, Joss Whedon or Russell Hoban and actually incorporate a mixed language based on what were presumed to be the dominant cultures during the era of the story. Each writer did it in a different way - Burgess created NadSat, a fictional language that was a mixture of Russian and British slang, used by the lower class characters and the narrator of the novel; Whedon mostly kept to English but incorporated Chinese as swearwords and similar exclamations; Hoban based his entire novel on the phonetics of the characters' language, so that their very perception of the world was altered by the sounds made by their spoken words (so "England" became "Inland", which means they think of everywhere else as "Outland"). Whedon's approach is the easiest to incorporate and understand, while Hoban's is the hardest to understand and makes an unavoidable commentary on language. Burgess' is quite effective, but also perhaps takes the longest to plan - there are actually NadSat dictionaries to explain the 100+ terms he created for his characters to use.

              Likewise, having different characters speak in different languages can emphasise a political or social point. If the hierarchy has, say, Russian speakers on top, then Polish speakers and then Vietnamese speakers, that identifies more details about the world while serving as a handy guide to the positions of various characters.

              Anyway, hope this helps in some way. Like Terrapun, feel free to ask for more detail/explanation on any of the above points. I'll try not to ramble too hard ;p
              SliceOfDog's Signature


              My Insatiable Curiosity RP character - Haheen Jaquoi

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              • #8

                (I'm sorry that I'm responding so late, hope you do not mind. Also... hi Slice! Nice of you to join in on the discussion!)

                I am of opinion that you should write it if you feel that this is a story you like to tell, You are tackling an ambitious and hard subject. I would be quite interested what will come of it! Writing it in Polish is a good writing exercise, translating it into English afterwards is even better allowing you to hone your skills in two languages... and probably frustrate yourself to no end in the process.

                If you want some inspiration from the classics and closer to home reading some of the books by Janusz Zajdel might be a good place to find inspiration about a lot of totalitarian and oppressive regimes. The man seemed to like to dissect them to see how they work. He even has his own example of a made up language in the form of “Koalang” in his book Paradyzja. ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koalang ) It is not exactly the most “current” of writers, but who knows, maybe you'll find something you like in his books.

                Will your story tie in to the “Codyverse” in some way, as a prequel of sorts, or will it be a standalone affair?
                Terrapun's Signature
                "A smart machine will first consider which is more worth its while: to perform the given task or, instead, to figure some way out of it."
                Stanisław Lem "The Futurological Congress"

                "The universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space--each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."
                xkcd

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                • #9

                  I went to the point the story didn't really reach anywhere, still tied to the stupid plot when one of the hybrids is kicked out of the facility. While the story really goes nowhere, it went to scrap for the time being at the moment. I can't even get on with Codyverse/Imperfection at the moment, due to the fact I'm having intern (or student training) at one of the most sad places in the world - namely, Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Museum. It doesn't really add up to the depression that will slowly ascede in the recent months due to... well... past relationship.

                  For the time being, I'm doing roleplay stuff on the-site-you-all-know-but-i-cannot-mention-it. Cause PG13 and all that. As for the Moreytown, maybe we should return to the discussion in which you'd say what you'd like and what would you add into the stuff. If I was to do something with the Moreytown as the plot, I'd add at least two endings and yet another romance path - which would be the cop. As for the endings (except for the part I have NO IDEA how to become The Shining One) - as I completed all but one challenges and plots), I'd add up something that is in... Way of the Samurai 2 and 3 - denial of the events coming around and just withdrawal from the events that are yet to occur. To be someone to watch the drama unfold.

                  As for the game, I really like the touch the author made. Namely, when you indirectly choose your sexuality - sex of Kris Westbrook (that interviewer) changes.

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                  • #10

                    It looks interesting, but I disagree with the author on a few things. And I'll leave it at that.
                    Rusakov's Signature
                    This fight will be your death!

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