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    Dakeen

    Realized I hadn't put any of my setting stuff in here. Enjoy.

    Era 1: Primacy, Tribalism, and Stone age kingdoms


    Nobody knows for sure how long the primacy lasted. Even the merrow and the Elves, who trace their history back eons, didn't invent writing systems until everyone else started. They can be excused- it's difficult to introduce new ideas in cultures with people as old as immortal elves, and ink and paper hold up poorly in the merrows' environment. Before the concept of writing, people drew on walls of caves to tell their stories. They hunted the dinosaurs with naught but stone tipped spears, living off the land's bounty. It is a time where history was unwritten, but spoken. The names of their greatest leaders are passed down in legend.


    The time of tribalism marked the true ascent of society. It is unknown which nation invented writing first- many claim they were responsible- but the pictograms spread through the world, carved on the backs of men and women who feared forgetting their shapes. With writing came records, and with records came taxes, receipts, maps, contracts, and formal diplomatic boundaries. The beginnings of nations took shape in the alliances of tribes, and the beginning of true war took shape in the betrayal of those alliances.


    The stone age kingdoms were the apex of pre-metal society. They had walls, soldiers, priests, scribes, and everything else you would expect of any other society. After paper was discovered, so was paper money and credits. The economy exploded in every direction, and society went with it. The cogs of industry began turning slowly in the watermills and windmills, turning the world to do the people's work. Savages in the wilds learned the value of money, and soon, kingdoms encompassed areas far outside their walls as tribes volunteered as border guard in return for food and other services. The tribes who did not join a kingdom lasted through much of the age, but as time went on, more people joined with the kingdoms and the tribe alliances for their children's sake.










    The Medieval Ages
    Metal, the guilds, the printing press


    With the advent of metal came the creation of better weapons, better technology, and better life. Rocky areas that once could not be farmed became targets of expanding kingdoms. Thousands of metal smithing techniques were born, and more weapons came to exist in a few decades than had existed for millennia before. The art of mass warfare became necessary for kings to master. Those who didn't lost their lands as the more cunning tacticians spread their influence ever outward.


    In order to deal with constantly expanding and evolving technology, the most skilled masters of all the crafts banded together to ensure their skills would never be lost to war, plague or famine. Thus were the guilds born. As they grew in complexity, so too did they grow in power. They became crucial for winning any battle, as they were responsible for fielding the technicians to repair vital structures and equipment for the kingdoms. Their control over the economy grew to such a point that their control over the economy matched royalty's. This relationship was tense at first, but by inviting ambassadors from each of the guilds to act as advisers, it further cemented royal power.


    The stability was threatened with the invention of the forums. Someone made a printing press based off of the ones used to make currency, but made it with movable type, instead. With the invention of the news papers, authors could communicate with many people all at once- and they could communicate back to the author. The first major group to do so was the farmers, who wrote about their personal experiences with different crops, told the writers about home remedies they knew of for various sicknesses, and different crafting tricks they had. What was basic knowledge to them was a library of information for everyone else. The influx of raw genius from the countryside and the slums lead to new training outreach programs and networked guild programs. For the first time in history, the masses were being taught, and they were teaching back.







    The Imperial ages


    Two major inventions were made at about the same time: Steam powered engines and Clockwork devices. Both of them allowed for the creation of powerful weapons and amazing vehicles. Transport moved from old foot paths to the railway and the sky as trains and airships became the new standards of locomotion. While melee weapons never truly disappeared, the clockbow- a spring powered, stringless crossbow- became the new standard for the soldier. The spitter, a steam powered automatic crossbow bolt launcher, became the norm in siege warfare. Enormous ships suspended by gas and propelled by steam housed fighter gliders to do combat in air and against the ground.


    Technology didn't march on, it raced. Electricity, magnetism, and radiowaves were discovered, studied and mastered. Cordless communication went from being magic's domain to being an enormous network extending far beyond the control of any one empire. Ionizing lasers were made that zapped enemy gliders out of the sky. Enormous towers marked the borders of hostile nations, melting anything that got too close with a destructive burst of lightning. Mortals were harnessing the power of gods.


    The last true age of order was heralded by the automata. Thinking machines that could learn and create, they were made to work the dangerous engine rooms of steam ships. It wasn't long before they were employed as soldiers, beasts of burden, office workers, and librarian indexers. Though useful, they were not without a serious flaw- without sufficient energy, they stopped moving and fell asleep until they had more energy. By living within the wireless powergrid, they could work virtually forever.




    The age of anarchy
    Nuclear power, Cyber brains, Biopunk


    The automata worked together to accomplish their goals, which included furthering technology. The clockwork congress discovered and mastered the use of nuclear power to create energy. Of course, this also lead to new weapons and measures against them. Powered personal armor became a reality, as did nuclear weapons, nuclear trains, aeroplanes, underwater vessels, and cities whose scale broke the skyline from miles away. All of them built, manned, and protected by the guilds. The age of government power was over.


    The automata continued their work, which included improving humans and automata. They succeeded in both. They created computer chips, and with them came Droids and Cyborgs. Originally designed as a way to cross the gap in damaged nerves and sectors of the brain, it wasn't long before they realized they could also improve the brain. Larger memory, faster thinking, and networked capabilities all became realities to the public, sold by the corporations without regard to the results. Although the droids created were susceptible to hackers, they could transfer information much more quickly. Through the use of part-replacements, many automata eventually became droids- though just as many remained skeptical of its safety.


    Finally, they succeeded in their ultimate mission. Through the work of countless automata, organics and droids, they mastered DNA. Designer babies became the norm. Cultural criticism of the fat, stupid, ugly or sick became normal. As more people achieved physical 'perfection,' the biological designs became more exotic. Elven genes were applied in human bodies to halt and reverse aging. Troll dna was integrated into slave soldiers to make them able to recover from injuries without having to pay for medicare. Even as the lines between races blurred, they became more distant- because of the patchwork dna, many of the elite could no longer reproduce naturally. They began work on recombinant epigenetic DNA that could pass their traits down through any race. They succeeded, but it never got much press coverage before the next era was ushered in.
    13Swords's Signature
    Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

    #2
    Re: Dakeen

    bit of an update on the setting. the crunch for each of the above ages has been written out, and kept mostly simple- i'm still working on reducing the word count on the description on the sniffer, pbut part of the problem may be that it's just a complex device. Okay, not super complex, but not many people know much about radio signals.
    13Swords's Signature
    Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

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      #3
      Re: Dakeen

      Now working on putting the setting books together, but there's a few questions i'm wondering about.... 1: Races, Animals, and Geography don't really change from one setting to the next. Should I include all of them in every setting book, or just make one book for the common elements, and then in each setting book, write about the distinctions? 2: How should I organize the book? I'm thinking 'things the players need to know' followed by 'things the gm needs to know to make the setting,' but maybe there's a better way to do it. This is also kinda dependent on how you think I should do question 1. My current order (which I plan on changing) is: [Foreward and Introduction to Dakeen] [Era 1: Primacy, Tribalism, and Stone-age Kingdoms ] [Races of the Dakeen] [Hazards of the Stone Era] [Missions, Quests and Campaigns of the Stone-Era] [Geography of Dakeen] [Cities of the Stone-Era] [Animals of Dakeen] [Equipment and Magic]
      13Swords's Signature
      Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

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        #4
        Re: Dakeen

        So, on splitting the dakeen setting books into a core book and the era books, I basically get one book that's about 50 pages and eight books that are about 15 each, which is no problem. I'm going to fluff up the setting books with a few pictures, but this also gives me some room to go more in depth about each of the eras, and even ages. This got me thinking about social classes, and what kind might exist in dakeen and how they could be useful background mechanics for player (or even nonplayer) characters.

        Something I want to avoid, though, is creating social classes that do not make sense within the context of dakeen.

        I created dakeen so that the players' actions could be world-changing. Basically, I didn't want them to rp in a world where the government functions as every job and where interfering is illegal. That stuff bores me, and I can't gm a game that bores me. The way it works is that all work is basically contracted out to companies that the royal families are most comfortable with taking the job. Usually this is attained through winning at the annual spring tourney, but it's all still ultimately up to the nobility. Basically, the nobility controls the money and grants authorities to the companies they hire to do different things.

        That said, those contracts are not exclusive. It's regular pay, but both nobility and private citizens may pay for their own services (see: mercenaries) for any of their necessities (see: Privateering). If you're not a member of nobility, the noble families' general response to you is to ignore you if you're making tax dollars and to exterminate you if you're causing more financial harm than revenue. A corporate privateer is legal as long as he pays all taxes on goods stolen, attacks no government contracted ships, and does not lie about their profession. However, hiring assassins or mercenaries to kill privateers is also legal (so air-pirates vs footpad ninjas is a valid trope in the imperial setting, for instance.)

        At a point, the frifth guilds come into existence, and killing someone isn't as easy as hiring an assassin and filing it on your taxes as a business expense. But even they technically aren't police like we think of them today.

        So here's how I see it.

        On the most basic level, you have nobility. Nobility not only control money, but they must be good at war, battle, politics and subterfuge. Fighting with a nobleman means fighting a trained killer who probably has better equipment than you. They have to be ready at a moment's notice to repel enemy invasions and to take charge of local situations to protect the peace. A nobleman who fails as a leader but is a well liked person may be given a public office, but nobility who makes the locals turn against nobility are executed publicly (next to any commoners who attacked the nobility, of course.) Any characters of noble background would have a high amount of responsibilities- literally jobs that their family may kill them for if they don't complete- but are rewarded with great authority and wealth.

        One level down, you have commoners. If nobility comes from the people who first began living in forts, commoners come from the tribes that saw the stone forts and wanted a safer place to live. Law enforcement in a nation usually only extends to keeping the peace in public- if someone is murdered, the family must pay someone to perform an investigation. With the existence of common magic, though, there is a fair chance they may actually find out who did it. But even if you do, they may be protected- if the killing of someone provided more tax revenue in a day than that person provided tax revenue in a decade, it makes nobility more money, and is therefore legal. This does cause all sorts of problems, but since killing someone basically requires a large payment of money, it does cut down on the number of killings by quite a bit. From a gameplay perspective, commoners have very few responsibilities, but also no guaranteed income.

        One level over, you have clergy. Clergy in Dakeen are distinct from clergy in real medieval ages in that they basically live off the earnings of donations from like-minded individuals rather than from forced payments or tax money. Nobles may have their own religions, but as a group, they tend to distrust the religious organizations as a separate power. The fears are justified- more than one religious group has been responsible for the destruction of a local political leader. They train their own people to read, to fight, and to do every other job that nobles must know how to do- in a sense, they are voluntary participation governments. And therein lies the rub. Nobles find it incredibly difficult to attack a religion that people love that has more warriors than the nobleman has citizens. In order to appease citizens, and to keep on good terms with local religious groups, nobility often grants the clergy special rights that do not apply to commoners. From a game-play perspective, clergy have some stable income and limited authorities, but much more responsibility than most commoners. They enjoy a level of protection comparable to state-contracted companies.

        One level the other way, you have criminals. Anybody can be a criminal. The most common crime is not paying taxes on goods or services. This lets people earn more money without any additional responsibility. If they're found out, they have ten times the amount they shorted the nobility taken from their estates. People who don't have enough money to pay for their crimes are put into forced labor by the state they shorted. Technically speaking, many people are criminals- bartering without sending some materials to the state is illegal, for instance- but it's the degree that matters. If your lifestyle depends on your criminality, you definitely do not want to be caught.

        So, overall, that leaves the following groups:

        Nobles: High responsibility. High authority, High income.
        State-contracted commoners: Moderate responsibility. Moderate authority, moderate income.
        Clergy: Moderate state responsibility. Moderate state authority, moderate income. High religious responsibility. High religious authority.
        Private commoners: Low social responsibilities (taxes). Authority over their own goods and services, which includes the authority to deny goods and services. No state-guaranteed income.

        Now, someone might just be a private commoner, but that doesn't mean they lack power. A CEO of a company might avoid state contracts due to the responsibility associated with them. In his case, authority over company goods and services is as broad a power as his company has power. Likewise, different levels in clergy or even nobility share different levels of responsibility, so it's not like this stuff is set in stone. This idea of social class is sort of a mixture of an "income" attribute, as well as a "Vow" mechanic and a social power mechanic.

        What do y'all think?
        13Swords's Signature
        Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Dakeen

          1: Races, Animals, and Geography don't really change from one setting to the next. Should I include all of them in every setting book, or just make one book for the common elements, and then in each setting book, write about the distinctions? 2: How should I organize the book? I'm thinking 'things the players need to know' followed by 'things the gm needs to know to make the setting,' but maybe there's a better way to do it. This is also kinda dependent on how you think I should do question 1. My current order (which I plan on changing) is: [Foreward and Introduction to Dakeen] [Era 1: Primacy, Tribalism, and Stone-age Kingdoms ] [Races of the Dakeen] [Hazards of the Stone Era] [Missions, Quests and Campaigns of the Stone-Era] [Geography of Dakeen] [Cities of the Stone-Era] [Animals of Dakeen] [Equipment and Magic]
          I think I'm coming in late with this, since your most recent post suggests you've made a decision, but just in case I've read it wrong, I think generic information on the system should be distinct (whether by being a different book or a different chapter/s) to information on the world itself. If this is something you're planning on sharing outside of your own RP groups (which from our chats off-site I've presumed it will be) then you really want a short description of the setting at the start to hook players, and then the core info they need to know how to play. This would likely include races, since they'll want to know what they can play as. After that, you can start to feed in information about the world, which I would imagine would be a short summary of each era, generic lists of items/classes in each era, then your animals and geography at the end, maybe followed by some sample characters.

          The detailed versions of each era, I feel, should be separate, though could be a single book, theoretically. If you did that, it would allow you to move animals and geography to that book instead.

          In terms of what the player needs to know and what the GM needs to know, splitting them is always sensible. Players don't need to be bogged down with info they don't need, and GMs need to be confident they can keep a few tricks up their sleeves in terms of working within this setting (eg. if you're setting out the history of this world, they might include events or characters listed, and not want players to know how it all turns out)

          Now, in terms of your class system, it's certainly a curiously functioning society, but I suppose you wanted something distinctive. May I ask what about it you're unsure about/willing to change? That'll give me a clearer idea of what to focus on in terms of a response.
          SliceOfDog's Signature
          My Insatiable Curiosity RP character - Haheen Jaquoi

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            #6
            Re: Dakeen

            Sure man. To give some better perspective
            Anomaly is the physics. That's its own book. Its da rool buhk.
            Dakeen is the primary setting, but it goes through 8 eras with 3 ages each era. The animals, races, spells, and geography mostly stay exactly the same.
            The eras have different social situations that will create different styles of play. This is where the 'class system' comes into play. You can think of your character's class as a condition on how easy they'll be able to achieve or acquire things, and what that will cost them. For example: Society changes from Feudal to Imperial to technocracy-anarchy, and in each one of these, the social situation is not the same.

            I should also point out that most of the class system as i've created it has basis in history. For example- in some parts of medieval germany, if someone was stealing from someone else, and you weren't trying to stop them, people would just assume you were in cahoots and would beat you up. But the guards wouldn't. They'd just let them, because commoners wasn't their job. The frifth guilds are arguably the predecessors of modern police, and the frifth guilds couldn't have come to be if the nobility was enforcing protection laws for the common people to begin with. It's just some stuff to look up.

            Anyway, I'm willing to change most of it, as long as it's derived from the source, and not derived from a common perception on what medieval life was like. Basically, nobility cares about the miilitary and big picture crime, and the commoners are mostly left to fend for themselves. You'll also notice that the classes are defined by the manner in which they bring in money, but not by the means- like, there's no mage or rogue or warrior, because what matters is how reliable your work is and why you have it. So any proposed idea that stuck to that would be welcome.
            13Swords's Signature
            Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Dakeen

              The three magics


              I don't know if there is any reason to exclude any of these. While it is true that I only think of Arcane when I think of engineering possibilities, it's only because I've worked so long on making a modular arcane spell system. The other two are Pysonicism and Elementalism. Psyonicism is closer to sorcery than it is to arcane magic and functions very differently, though a careful observer will notice a few similarities. Elementalism is completely different. Any one of the three could be the foundation of their own setting, and all three could easily be included in one setting and have a balanced effect.


              arcane users are good for many skirmishes throughout the day where the number of actions they have to deal with each round is a low number. They have good long-term stamina but are easily overloaded by concentrated enemy attacks. In the age of Ygdrassil's Breach, Arcane users can also network with aetherial beings for powerful effect.


              Psyonic users are good for battles with high intensity rounds but not as good for battles that last a prolonged number of rounds where they must act. Unlike mages, they're better at hitting hard and fast, but aren't so good in long battles. The number of battles they can be in decreases as the lengths of those battles increases. While they can't just hand off their spells to each other, they are especially good in combat due to how savage their abilities are, and the way they're fueled.


              Elementalists are only good for a certain number of battles a day, because they only regain a number of HP equal to their body ranks every day. This means while they can last a long number of hours one day, they won't necessarily be able to the next. In short, if you can manage to get the entire clash of armies in a day to happen in a single battle, elementalists will crush the opposition. Stretch it out and you will drain them dry, and they won't be able to recover in time to repel a concentrated effort.


              My only issue is considering whether or not to include all three in the base dakeen setting. I will for certain be including elementalism and arcane magic. I do not know if I will be including pysonicism as its own package. Elementalism is very different and hard to confuse with arcane magic, but psyonicism may confuse players. I may also be able to introduce the three as separate 'classes' of characters, even though there's no such thing as levels in anomaly.
              13Swords's Signature
              Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

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                #8
                was going to upload my setting's constants book, but it exceeds the data size limit. :|

                Here's my work on the medieval social structures instead.

                Also, a note. While this setting does have furries and scifi in it, it also has fantasy and has just as many nonfurry races (5/10), so lemme know if this doesn't belong here. Haven't quite gotten to fleshing out the scifi yet because it relies on me finishing up the settings beneath it, first, which I have good headway on.
                Attached Files
                13Swords's Signature
                Some things are right. Some things are wrong. I'm right when I say I'm wrong.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Obviously I've already seen this and given a little bit of feedback, but when I catch a spare minute I shall read the rest! In the meantime:

                  Originally posted by 13Swords View Post
                  While this setting does have furries and scifi in it, it also has fantasy and has just as many nonfurry races (5/10), so lemme know if this doesn't belong here.
                  Pah! Of course this belongs here! Firstly, there's the whole can of worms regarding "fantasy" inherently being a sub-genre of Science Fiction (or vice versa), but beyond that, we're not going to start instituting mandatory minimum percentages of furry content. Some kind of affirmative action but for fictional characters. Any furry is furry enough. One might argue that the likes of elves or fairies, which contain animal features to some extent, are furry enough in their own rights.
                  SliceOfDog's Signature
                  My Insatiable Curiosity RP character - Haheen Jaquoi

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